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Health System Management • January 2017

10 WWW.HEALTHSYSTEMMGMT.COM left Americans aching for jobs, putting recruiters in the fortunate position of having countless qualified candidates to choose from. In 2017 and into the next few years, however, Chee anticipates that recruiters will need to think outside of the box to bring in highly sought-after candidates, even within their own organizations. “These roles must be filled — and candidates know that,” said Chee. “They’re being inundated with LinkedIn messages from recruiters, and the temptation to find the bigger, better deal is always there.” Recruiters need to realize that the job offer itself is no longer the perk it used to be. Now, job offers must be accompanied by tempting perks such as signing bonuses, unlimited paid time off, reimbursement for cellphones and, if possible, a casual work environment or the option to work remotely. Further, Chee pointed towards a shift in the interview process itself. “The days of multiple phone interviews followed by three or four in-person are over,” she said. “Those highly sought-after candidates are looking for convenience, so employers will need to condense the process. This could be performing panel interviews rather than one-onone, live or recorded web interviews, personality or technical assessments — whatever they need to do to find the right, qualified person in a fraction of the time.” In 2017, health system management professionals will need to increase their focus on mid-level positions, particularly in nonclinical settings. These often overlooked positions will be quickly opening up as baby boomers move towards retirement, and to get the most qualified applicants, recruiters will need to act fast. “The key for 2017 is going to be speed — knowing exactly what qualifications you want the ideal candidate to have, and then deciding quickly,” said Chee. “Many times, candidates will quickly lose interest just because it’s taking too long for the company to decide. With the candidate having options everywhere, this can be really dangerous.” COVER STORY HEALTH SYSTEM MANAGEMENT | JANUARY | 2017 “There’s a strong difference between clinical mid-level positions and nonclinical mid-level positions.” perience for different titles varies between focuses and practices, and in today’s economy, even so-called “entry level” positions often require years of professional experience alongside a two- or four-year degree. For the sake of this article, “mid-level” is used to refer to those positions that fall between entry- and senior-level positions and typically require three to five years of relevant professional experience. What “mid-level” means specifically is unique to each institution; however, such positions do tend to be nonclinical positions with room for career growth without necessarily requiring further education. “I think there’s a strong difference between clinical mid-level positions and nonclinical mid-level positions,” said Jennifer Chee, senior director of talent acquisition at The Tolan Group, an executive search firm with a primary focus in the healthcare industry. “On the clinical side, I’ve definitely seen a shift away from mid-level positions in favor of entry- or senior-level positions. On the nonclinical side, however, there’s still a very strong need for mid-level employees.” Chee went on to express exactly how strong that need is: At any given time, there are an estimated 400,000 nonclinical positions in the US healthcare industry waiting to be filled. “This can be attributed to the large number of baby boomers that are entering retirement,” she explained. “They’re leaving their senior-level roles, which is forcing the mid-levelers to move into senior roles. This leaves a gap that entry-level employees might not be able to fill.” So, how can healthcare management professionals go about filling these crucial positions? RECRUITING FROM WITHIN Unsurprisingly, Chee expects the trend of internal recruiting to continue into 2017. Many larger organizations mandate that positions are posted within the company for a set period of time before external recruiting is even a possibility, and it makes sense: Internal candidates are familiar with the workplace culture, the mission, the employees and likely, what the job will entail. However, while internal recruitment might be commonplace, that doesn’t mean there aren’t financial perks to hiring from outside of your organization. “With mid-level, nonclinical positions, people entering these roles are usually getting a promotion,” Chee said. “These people are often millenials who come into an organization fresh out of college, get a few years of experience and then move onto something else. But if someone has an amazing opportunity, maybe at a company they really wanted to join, they will take a lateral move.” THINKING OUTSIDE OF THE BOX With baby boomers retiring at a shocking rate—upwards of 10,000 per day through 2030, according to Chee’s estimates—recruiters will need to shift the way that they approach interviews. The recession Jennifer Chee WEBEXTRA As hiring becomes a top priority for healthcare organizations, employees are becoming more involved in it at all levels — even the C-suite. For examples of how healthcare executives are engaging in the hiring process, read “Hiring Success!” at www.HealthSystemMgmt.com


Health System Management • January 2017
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